Staff feeling better about working lives according to national survey

Staff Survey 2017 - more staff feel better about their working lives

More staff working in NHS mental health and learning disability services across Leeds and York feel better about their working lives according to results from the latest NHS staff survey published on 6 March 2018.

The survey, which was carried out in the autumn of 2017, was completed by a record-breaking 56 per cent of staff (1,347 people) at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. This was the Trust’s highest ever response rate to a full staff census of over 2,500 people and four per cent above the national average for mental health and learning disability trusts in England.

Headline results show that:

  • 70% of staff believe care of service users is the Trust’s top priority – one per cent up on last year
  • More staff would recommend the Trust as a place to work or receive treatment compared to last year, and more would be happy with the standard of care
  • However, 69% believe the Trust acts on concerns raised by service users – a decline of one per cent on last year

Staff experience is a significantly positive area for the Trust with results showing the Trust performs better than the national average in a number of key areas. These include:

  • A reduction in the number of staff working extra hours – now three per cent lower than the national average
  • Fewer staff attending work despite feeling unwell – four per cent lower than the national average
  • Fewer staff feeling unwell due to work-related stress – four per cent lower than the national average

The Trust has significantly improved in two other areas compared to its results last year, including:

  • A reduction in the number of staff experiencing physical violence from patients, relatives or the public – five per cent less than the previous year
  • More staff saying they have supportive managers – up to 3.95 from 3.88 in the previous year (based on a scale of 1-5)

 

The Trust also performed well on workforce race equality. There was a four per cent reduction in the number of black and minority ethnic (BME) staff experiencing harassment, bullying or abuse from patients, relatives or the public; and 81% of BME staff believed the Trust provided equal opportunities for career progression or promotion – an increase of three per cent on last year and four per cent above the national average.

 

There are a number of areas where the Trust’s results have fallen below the national average. These include:

  • Staff motivation at work
  • Effective team working
  • Staff reporting experiences of violence (which relates to the reporting culture of the organisation)
  • Effective use of service user feedback
  • Fairness and effectiveness of procedures for reporting errors, near misses and incidents

 

There was also a decline in staff satisfaction with the quality of work and care staff are able to deliver based on the Trust’s previous year’s results – however the Trust’s score remains in line with the national average.

Susan TylerSusan Tyler, Director of Workforce Development at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, said: “I’m delighted that more staff than ever before made their voice count this year. The more people who take part – the stronger and more meaningful the results are.

“There are a number of positive results around staff experience and wellbeing and this is fantastic news. We’ve invested a lot in staff engagement and health and wellbeing, and teams and services have been participating in development and improvement initiatives that have clearly paid off.

“There are some areas that we need to focus on in the coming year. If staff feel they cannot deliver the quality of work they’d aspire to then we need to find out what we can do change this.

“Improving recruitment and retention of staff is one of our big strategic priorities. To fulfil our ambition of providing outstanding services as an employer of choice, we need outstanding people and we need to keep them. Our plans include investing in the whole spectrum of the workforce, from apprentices to senior leaders.

“We’ve got plans to improve team working already in place. We’ve started working with team leaders to help them build high performing teams as we know there are strong links to improved patient care.

“The effective use of service user feedback is vital to our services and we are working to improve the way we gather and act on feedback. The Care Quality Commission recently noted that whilst we’ve got some good practice at individual service level, we need to do more to embed this across the Trust. We’re currently developing a new service user experience team and we’ll be working directly with service users and carers in the coming weeks so they can help shape the way we do this in future.”

Susan concluded: “We’ll be analysing the results of the survey in fine detail and sharing specific data with individual services and teams so they can put their own action plans in place. I’ll be sharing a more detailed action plan with the Trust Board soon.”

 

Results highlights

Areas where the Trust is performing better than the national average for mental health and learning disability trusts:
Key finding Trust score/ percentage 2017 National average for mental health and learning disability trusts Positive Difference
Percentage of staff attending work in the last three months despite feeling unwell because they felt pressured to do so 49% 53% 4%
Percentage of staff feeling unwell due to work-related stress in the last 12 months 38% 42% 4%
Percentage of staff working extra hours 69% 72% 3%
Percentage of staff reporting most recent experience of harassment, bullying or abuse (indicates a positive reporting culture – higher score is better) 64% 61% 3%
Percentage of staff reporting errors, near misses or incidents

(indicates a positive reporting culture – higher score is better)

95% 93% 2%

 

Significant local changes since the 2016 survey
Key results

Trust score/

percentage 2017

Trust score/

percentage 2016

Difference
+ is positive
– is negative

Percentage of staff experiencing physical violence from patients, relatives or the public in the last 12 months 22% 27% +5%
Support from immediate managers 3.95 3.88 +0.07
Staff satisfaction with the quality of work and care they are able to deliver 3.81 3.90 -0.09

 

Areas where the Trust is performing unfavourably with other mental health and learning disability trusts
Key finding Trust score/ percentage 2017 National average for mental health and learning disability trusts Negative Difference
Effective team working
(the higher the score out of 5, the better)
3.77 3.84 0.7
Percentage of staff reporting most recent experience of physical violence
(the higher the score, the better)
90% 93% 3%
Effective use of patient / service user feedback
(the higher the score out of five, the better)
3.59 3.72 0.13
Staff motivation at work
(the higher the score out of 5, the better)
3.82 3.91 0.09
Fairness and effectiveness of procedures for reporting errors, near misses and incidents
(the higher the score out of five, the better)
 

3.67

3.75 0.08
Further information

Download the summary report of the Trust’s results.

 

Find more information about the national NHS Staff Survey on their website